02 – Week Two (29 March-4 April)


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Saturday April 4

Sites Visited: Palaikastro

Where did we stay tonight?: Matala

Leaders: Dallis Fox and Katie Holroyd

Saturday morning dawned early, and we were all up just early enough to grab a piece of home-made cake (courtesy of our hotel owner) or a piece of bread from the bakery down the street. We hiked through the tiny town of Palaikastro to meet with Dr. Sandy MacGillivray and Dr. Hugh Sackett, the head excavators of the site of Palaikastro, an ancient Minoan town. After getting a behind the scenes tour of the dig house, a converted monastery olive press, we journeyed into the ancient town. Us “sherd nerds” (as coined by Dr. MacGillivray for our love of broken pottery) wound our way through the ancient streets and rooms of Palaikastro, keeping a wary eye on the looming peak sanctuary that we had arduously climbed the day before. We took a brief break from the engaging lecture to get in touch with our true Minoan side; a few of us stopped to hug a baetyl (or large ritual stone) and descended into the lustral basin (a Minoan cult room). By the end of the day we felt truly connected to the site, a few of us even became determined to excavate the hidden palace buried adjacent to the town.

After bidding a fond farewell to Palaikastro, we headed west on the noble roads of Crete. One quick lunch at the Siteia Plataea later, we all took a much needed nap on the bus to the Heraklion airport where we dropped of Professor Christesen for his flight home. A few more hours of bus time later we arrived at Matala, a tiny Cretan town nestled on the beach and filled with and abundance of French high school students.

However, this day was no ordinary day, for it was our dear Alexander Assaf’s twenty-first birthday! In celebration we all went out to dinner in a restaurant overlooking the beach during which we were surprised by heavy rainstorms that, little did we know, would carry over into the next day. After dinner, exhausted from a long day of driving and birthday festivities, we all headed back to the hotel to rest up for a busy day of work on Sunday.

Turkeys at Palaikastro:

Photo Gallery:

Dr. MacGilliveray lectures at the Palaikastro dig house

Dr. MacGillivray lectures at the Palaikastro dig house

Jason samples the East Cretan breakfast of champions: wild herbs and Frappe to go.

Jason samples the East Cretan breakfast of champions: wild herbs and Frappe to go.

Dr. Hugh Sackett explains the settlement at Palaikastro.

Dr. Hugh Sackett explains the settlement at Palaikastro.

KT hugs the baetyl in anticipation of her future psychometrical career path.

KT hugs the baetyl in anticipation of her future psychometrical career path.

KT and Dallis conduct more psychometrical research in a lustral basin at Palaikastro.

KT and Dallis conduct more psychometrical research in a lustral basin at Palaikastro.

Fearless leader Dallis with newly minted 21 year old, Alex A.

Fearless leader Dallis with newly minted 21 year old, Alex A.

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Friday, April 3

Sites Visited: Ayios Nikolaos Museum, Lato (Classical Cretan city), Siteia Museum, Petsophas (Minoan peak sanctuary)

Where did we stay tonight?: Palaikastro

Leaders:  Kait Barber and Joe Indvik

A Day Poem by Kait and Joe

Our morning was full of museums and sites, after a delayed start from the hotel:

Oh Museum

So small and near

We picked some pots

That we hold dear

Each group would chose

A different bowl

Or rhyton or tool

Or skull with gold

A long necked woman

Holding a pot

Was one rhyton

We liked a lot

The Minoans used

Pithoi and larnakes

To bury the dead

PCC says

We then packed up

And Lato we seak

To see the temple

And two peaks

With vultures flying

In the sky

We ate our lunch

And climbed up high

Cisterns dug

Into the ground

Held water tight

Safe and sound

Symposium rooms

And shrines explored

Back to the bus

To study more

Another museum

What a shock

We gathered round

To have a look

Palaikastro kouros

Ivory made

Stands unique

With gold inlaid

His arms are up

Like Minoans do

Sandy thinks

He’s Orion too

With the morning done

We will not stop

Until will come

To the mountain top


We then travelled to yet another peak sanctuary at Petsofas. We have composed a small poem to reflect the challenges of the climb and the resulting disposition of the group:

Oh Petsofas,

Your rocky peak,

Is like nails of granite,

In our feet.

Your prickly growths,

And daunting slopes,

Dash soothing water,

On our fiery hopes.

The path is hidden,

The winds blow strong,

And yet we climb,

In trailblazing song.

‘Twas to your peak,

Minoans came,

In search of something,

Much the same.

In Proto-Palatial,

And Neo too,

Ancestors struggled,

To surmount you.

They placed an altar,

Upon your summit,

What were they thinking,

Goshdarnit?

Now we struggle,

Like those before us,

To find your secrets,

Before night encroaches.

The trail is nothing,

But crag and bush,

You make no sense,

Like the other Bush.

Upwards we push!

Prof. C. leads the way,

No doubt disillusioned,

By the groans of dismay.

But what is this,

That transects our hajj?

This road, this passage,

Is it a mirage?

A path emerges!

It was there all along?

It calls to us now,

Like a podiatrist’s song.

Rest, weary feet,

Your travails are near done,

We’re really quite sorry,

That blisters have come.

Up, up we move,

The end is in sight,

We shall make it at last,

Though our hamstrings are tight.

We come to your peak!

The winds here are fierce,

The view is fantastic.

(We need some beers.)

We talk for a while,

Take a picture or two,

Then it’s back down the trail,

Seeking adventures, new.

Pestofas, at last,

We have beaten you back!

Your traps we have conquered,

*yawn*…Let’s hit the sack.


Intro video:

Scaling the Lato acropolis:

A quiet day at Lato:

Conclusion to day 13:


Photo Gallery:

Alex and Dallis love pots

Alex and Dallis love pots

Alex and Kait present on a Minoan artifact

Alex and Kait present on a Minoan artifact

Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

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Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

Springtime Flowers

Taking notes at Lato

Taking notes at Lato

The group explores the small temple at Lato.

The group explores the small temple at Lato.

Kait frolicks amongst the daisies.

Kait frolicks amongst the daisies.

The guys atop an acropolis at Lato

The guys atop an acropolis at Lato

The ladies make time for lunch at Lato.

The ladies make time for lunch at Lato.

Ally Takes a Break at Lato

Ally Takes a Break at Lato

Mountain goats/FSPers ascend the North acropolis at Lato.

Mountain goats/FSPers ascend the North acropolis at Lato.

One of the most important things about Lato is the well-preserved civic architecture, as we explored on our visit.  Visible here is the prytaneion and a collective cistern.

One of the most important things about Lato is the well-preserved civic architecture, as we explored on our visit. Visible here is the prytaneion and a collective cistern.

Dallis, Alex M., KT, and Kait express their enthusiasm for Lato in alphabetical form.

Dallis, Alex M., KT, and Kait express their enthusiasm for Lato in alphabetical form.

Ally is pleased to see some archaeozoological specimens (hippopotamus) in the Siteia museum.

Ally is pleased to see some archaeozoological specimens (hippopotamus) in the Siteia museum.

Ben gapes in wonderment at the famed ivory Palaikastro kouros

Ben gapes in wonderment at the famed ivory Palaikastro kouros

Mixed emotions and delicious cookies after an arduous climb.

Mixed emotions and delicious cookies after an arduous climb.

Descending Petsophas

Descending Petsophas

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Thursday, April 2

Sites Visited: None (day off)

Where did we stay tonight?: Ayios Nikolaos

Leaders: Alexander Assaf and Kate Ginsburg reporting

Alexander: Good day and welcome to the Agios Nikolaos daily news report. Today, we are your charming anchors are Alexander Assaf and Katherine Ginsburg. Your local weather man is, none other than, our favorite Joseph Indvik. With Sports, we have Christopher Johnson, and with the Daily Hum-Drum, Charles Clark.

Katherine: Breaking News Update: Agios Nikolaos is one of the most beautiful, magnificent places on Crete.

Alexander: Thank you, Katherine, could you report on what people did on this beautiful day?

Katherine: Certainly, Alexander—there were many a beach go-er today amongst the group: Christopher, Kathryn H., Alexandra, Benjamin, Dallis, and myself. Later in our sportscast, Christopher will give us an update on swimming in the Mediterranean. Spending the day at the beach was pure bliss. We followed the experience with a nice stroll–to familiarize ourselves with the town–and a nice long lunch at a local Cretan café.

Alexander: That sounds great, Katherine. Today, Joseph and I made our own excursion around Agios Nikolaos, and discussed the beauty of the mountains and the water. Oh boy, is the Mediterranean clear. We followed up with a nice Greco-Italian lunch.

Any idea of what the rest of the group did, Katherine?

Katherine: I believe Kaitlyn rested most of the day and rejuvenated herself to prepare for another long day on the FSP job. Jerry nearly was run over by a Beamer and a motorcycle. Kathryn M. made a trek of her own within the town. Sarah and Jason also parted their own ways to enjoy the town. Charles walked around town as well.

Alexander: Well, Katherine, that sure does sound like a lot of individual exploring. Hopefully, people learned much in the art of navigating, Greece, and beach today.

From the anchor’s desk, that’s all from us. Up next is your local forecast, the Daily Hum-Drum, and sports update. Good night.

Katherine: Night.

(Both anchors smile as the camera zooms out)

News you can use:

Beautiful Cretan day on Agios Nikolaos. Jo will further elaborate in our weather section.

Beautiful Cretan day on Agios Nikolaos. Jo will further elaborate in our weather section.

 

Benjamin, Dallis, and Jerry are sampling the foods to give their report on the local tastes within the city.

Benjamin, Dallis, and Jerry are sampling the foods to give their report on the local tastes within the city.

 

Local tourists (Alexandra, Dallis, and Kathryn H.) are seen jumping for, what appears to be, joy.  Katherine will have more to say about that later.

Local tourists (Alexandra, Dallis, and Kathryn H.) are seen jumping for, what appears to be, joy. Katherine will have more to say about that later.

 

A tribute to our amazing camera crew, who seem to be enjoying a nice day.  From left to right: Christopher, Jason, Sarah, Alexandra, Benjamin, Katherine, Dallis

A tribute to our amazing camera crew, who seem to be enjoying a nice day. From left to right: Christopher, Jason, Sarah, Alexandra, Benjamin, Katherine, Dallis

 

A pier full of boats in Agios Nikolaos on a great day demonstrates the slower part of tourism of the year.  Locals remain conservative as the economy shifts downward of a seismographic scale.

A pier full of boats in Agios Nikolaos on a great day demonstrates the slower part of tourism of the year. Locals remain conservative as the economy shifts downward of a seismographic scale.

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Wednesday, April 1

Sites Visited: Mallia (Minoan “palace”), Psychro Cave, Karphi (Sub-Minoan settlement)

Where did we stay tonight?: Ayios Nikolaos

Leaders: Ben Kahn and Dallis Fox

So we here we are, another day, another hotel, another beautiful adventure in the Cretan countryside. We woke up bright and early to check out of our beloved Hotel Kronos and meet our luxurious, private Charter bus. First stop was Malia, along the northeastern coast of Crete. We explored the ruins of the ancient Minoan palace of Malia in groups, fine tuning our on-the-spot analytical skills by interpreting sections of the complex and giving oral presentations. A heated debate ensued regarding the southern entrance to the central court—to process or not to process, that is the question. After a couple hours of lively discussion, we walked to the beach for lunch. (As a California girl herself, Dallis particularly loved the sand between her toes. She felt at home. Ben, a Jersey boy, didn’t mind the beach too much himself.)

With the help of Dallis’s large Dramamine supply, we were off to the Diktaian cave at Psychro. After zig-zagging along the precipices of the mountains in our bus (and most of our group catching up on some z’s) we awoke and hiked up a short but steep mountain to reach the entrance to the cave. We only had a short amount of time to see the cave, but it was more than enough to descend the winding staircases and get a mini-lecture about its importance to the Minoans, who threw lots of ritual items into the pool at the bottom. We all had fun pointing out stalagmites that looked like animals, but the most agreement came with one that looked like it had a chubby man climbing up the side of it.

After we emerged from the cave (or the “metaphorical womb” as Professor Faro explained) we headed off to the Minoan site of Karphi. It was already late in the day, and having hiked all day yesterday up and down and across and up and across and down multiple mountains, we were all dead tired. But we picked ourselves up by our bootstraps (our hiking boots that is), and set off for yet another gigantic mountain peak. The hike was in a gorgeous setting, with the snow-capped peak of Mt. Ida always looming in the background, as well as a huge green plain behind us in the valley. We came across many wild goats (and enough goat poo for a lifetime), but we all made it up in one piece. The incredible elevation and isolation of Karphi proves the dire circumstances that drove Minoans to seek shelter in such an uninhabitable place (can you say sea people?) They lived at Karphi for 150 years, but 45 minutes was enough for us as it started to drizzle and get colder. The rain held off, though, and the hike down the mountain was a relaxing one.

We then drove to the coastal town of Agios Nikolaos, where we split up to find a cheap hotel, and the search was a success. Tomorrow we have a day off in this beautiful coastal town, and after so many mountains hiked and peaks scaled, we could use a good night’s sleep and a relaxing day.

Palace at Mallia:

Beach picnic at Mallia:

Psychro Cave:

Evening shenanigans in Ayios Nikolaos:

Day 11 Photo Gallery:

Prof. Faro introduces the students to the Minoan site of Mallia.

Prof. Faro introduces the students to the Minoan site of Mallia.

Spring blooms in the Mallian hinterland.

Spring blooms in the Mallian hinterland.

Barber explains the west facade of the palace at Mallia

Barber explains the west facade of the palace at Mallia

Jason contemplates the many mysteries of the Kernos

Jason contemplates the many mysteries of the Kernos

A strange baetyl-like feature in the central court of the Palace at Mallia. Note the with the peak sanctuary at Karphi.

A strange baetyl-like feature in the central court of the Palace at Mallia. Note the alignment with the peak sanctuary at Karphi.

KT "goes Minoan"

KT "goes Minoan"

Souvenirs for Sale at the Cafe at Mallia--Guaranteed Genuine Minoan Objects, Really

Souvenirs for Sale at the Cafe at Mallia--Guaranteed Genuine Minoan Objects, Really

Lunch on the beach at Mallia.

Lunch on the beach at Mallia.

Jason Lunches on the beach at Mallia

Jason Lunches on the beach at Mallia

Jason and Ally on the beach at Mallia

Jason and Ally on the beach at Mallia

Alex demonstrating a point about the local palace, while lunching on the beach at Mallia

Alex demonstrating a point about the local palace, while lunching on the beach at Mallia

Professor Faro, intent on lunch

Professor Faro and Kathryn, looking intent, Joe in the background playing frisbee

Lunch over, everyone gets ready to go back to the bus...

Lunch over, everyone gets ready to go back to the bus...

Psychro Cave, birthplace of Zeus father of gods and men.

Psychro Cave, birthplace of Zeus father of gods and men.

The dank depths of Psychro Cave.

The dank depths of Psychro Cave.

Descending from Karphi--Notably Easier than the Ascent

Descending from Karphi--Notably Easier than the Ascent

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Tuesday, March 31

Sites Visited: Knossos (Minoan “palace”), Iuktas (peak sanctuary), Anemospilia (rural sanctuary)

Where did we stay tonight?: Herakleion

Leaders:  KT Holroyd and Charles Clark reporting

The Minoan civilization of ancient Crete had its ups and downs. For a few centuries during the Protopalatial period, things were good. The Minoan culture, preserved in their lavish and labyrinthine palaces, grew and developed. But then, around 1700 BC, the Minoan palaces were suddenly destroyed. Not easily discouraged, the Minoans rebuilt their palaces and their culture flourished once again. Except for Mycenaean invasions, earthquakes, and the Sea People, their troubles were over.

Today, our FSP had some ups and downs of its own. We began our morning at the Minoan palace of Knossos, the largest and most important Minoan site known to modern archaeologists. The palaces were large administrative, economic, and ritual complexes that were the center of the ancient civilization of Crete. Our tour of Knossos was an experience of history in living color. As we wound through the maze of fancifully titled rooms, including the Lobby of Wooden Posts, Shrine of the Double Axes, and Court of the Stone Spout, we were treated to vibrant reconstructions of the Minoan’s famous relief frescoes. Following Professor Faro’s lecture on the remains, we wrote short essays on the functions of various elements of palatial architecture and the influence of reconstruction on our understanding of the past.

After lunch, the real work of the day began with a steep climb to the Minoan peak sanctuary of Iuktas. At 800 meters, the Cretan landscape opened up into spectacular views, which we enjoyed during brief pauses along our ascent. At the summit, Professor Faro gave her second lecture of the day, this one about the role of peak sanctuaries in Minoan ritual. We spent some time hunting for pottery sherds at the site, which we were legally obligated to return to their find spots. Jason took the prize with a fragment of a painted cup interior.

Having finished at Iuktas, we blazed a trail up and over the next couple of peaks toward the site of Anemospilia, home of the only physical evidence in the ancient Greek world for human sacrifice. Rambling our way through the universally spiny Cretan brush with only goat paths to guide us, morale sank in some quarters. Other spirits soared, relishing the adventure of the wilderness passage. At Anemospilia, the prolific Professor Faro delivered yet another lecture, which included the grisly details of the site’s sacrificial fame. The shrine was destroyed by an earthquake, burying four Minoans. One of these unfortunate ancients had recently expired at the time of the collapse, his carotid artery severed by a knife found nearby. After participating in the traditional dramatic reconstruction of this ritual (sponsored by Mentos), we hiked back, running the last quarter mile to catch the 7:00 bus.

Back in Herakleion, we enjoyed a well earned Cretan meal at the Fish Tavern, which was punctuated by the immolation of the café across the street and the arrival of the fire engines. Later that night we attended the traditional waffles and ice cream feast with Professor Christesen in Herakleion’s Lion Square. Now, all we have to worry about is Sea People.

Arrival at Knossos:

Start of Iuktas hike:

Midway up Iuktas:

Terror on the mountainside!

Anemospilia Mentos reenactment:

Prof. Faro lectures to the group at Knossos.

Prof. Faro lectures to the group at Knossos.

The descent into the domestic quarters at Knossos

The descent into the domestic quarters at Knossos

Hearty travelers prepare for their visit to the peak sanctuary at Mt. Jouktas above Archanes.

Hearty travelers prepare for their visit to the peak sanctuary at Mt. Jouktas above Archanes.

Dallis, KT, Alex M. and Ben enjoy the fine view of Archanes from Mt Jouktas

Dallis, KT, Alex M. and Ben enjoy the fine view of Archanes from Mt Jouktas

Prof. Faro lectures from one of the walls of the Jouktas peak sanctuary.

Prof. Faro lectures from one of the walls of the Jouktas peak sanctuary.

Alex A. leaps the fence at Karphi.

Alex A. leaps the fence at Anemospilia.

Ben on the descent to Anemospilia

Ben on the descent to Anemospilia

Preparing for the Mentos Commercial

Preparing for the Mentos Commercial

Alex at Anemospilia

Alex at Anemospilia

Ally Looking Pensive at Anemospilia

Ally Looking Pensive at Anemospilia

An evening "vaffel" (waffle) outing in Herakleion with Prof. Christesen

An evening "vaffel" (waffle) outing in Herakleion with Prof. Christesen

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Monday, 30 March

Sites Visited: Herakleion Museum

Where did we stay tonight?: Herakleion

Leaders:  Joe Indvik and Ally Begly

Captain’s Log

6:00 a.m., Uncharted Waters (sort of)

We just anchored in the scurvy piratical haven that is Heraklion. After a long and restless night atop the fickle waves, in a vessel full of the wild and hormonal calls of Greek teenagers on vacation, we finally sighted land. It felt good to be on terra firma once again. We quickly sent three away teams of intrepid adventurers to scout the local inns for lodging. While we kicked back and enjoyed the high-life, eating bougatsa (a cinnamony custardish pastry-like delight of local origin), they scoured the city. Many of the knaves returned empty-handed. One team, however, was able to navigate these hostile lands and cajole the local innkeeper into housing our motley crew for two nights.

Captain’s Log

8:00 a.m., Lobby of Hotel Kronos

Feast. The innkeeper made the mistake of letting 14 famished sea-goers dine at his buffet. After two loaves of bread, two-dozen eggs, and enough yogurt to feed a small army (we’re assuming Greek armies eat yogurt), we retired to our quarters and let the dreams of the open sea overtake our minds again (what was in that yogurt?)

Captain’s Log

12:30 p.m., Streets of Heraklion

Captain Faro appeared and assumed control of the crew. She’s a hardened and seaworthy lass, accustomed to months on the sea with nothing to eat but dried fish and stale milk, second only to Blackbeard himself. She led us through the twisting and dark corridors of Heraklion to the Archaeological Museum. We walked along a coast once frequented by the most feared pirates of the Aegean (Crete was a haven for pirates under Arabic rule from 824-961 CE). At the museum, we examined the treasures of the ancient and mysterious Minoan civilization. As no good captain leaves his crew untested, we spent an hour writing about the long-lost tomb of an ancient nobleman (it was really a small sarcophagus).

Captain’s Log

5:00 p.m., Plaka Restaurant

Feast. We are not sick of Gyros yet.

Captain’s Log

8:00 p.m., Lobby of Hotel Kronos

The crew is entranced by the siren’s song of free Wi-Fi. Our captains left for dinner and we are contemplating a mutiny, given the early wake-up time tomorrow morning.

We probably will remain loyal to our captains, however, because we are promised a trip to the ancient site of Knossos.

Intro to day 9:

Working at the Herakleion Archaeological Museum:

Feast!

Day 9 Photo Gallery:

Our loyal caravel the surly Socrates

Our loyal caravel the surly Socrates

The triumvirate is complete: from left - Crassus, Pompey, and Caesar

The triumvirate is complete: from left - Crassus, Pompey, and Caesar

A Dark and Dangerous Street in Herakleion

A Dark and Dangerous Street in Herakleion

Which is bigger, Prof. Christesen or this double axe?

Which is bigger, Prof. Christesen or this double axe?

KT lectures on epiphanies of the god in Minoan art at the Heraklion Museum.

KT lectures on epiphanies of the god in Minoan art at the Heraklion Museum.

map-week-2Sunday, March 29

Sites Visited: Acropolis of Athens and areas/sites around the Acropolis

Where did we stay tonight?: on overnight boat to Crete

Leaders: Alex Maceda and Jason Spellmire reporting

We climbed today. A lot. Some things we climbed multiple times. The Areopagus, the Pnyx, the Acropolis, and, after the power went out, the eight flights of stairs to our hotel rooms, not counting the half dozen or so flights at the bottom before they start counting. That part was a bit demoralizing. You would start up the stairs and think, OK, this won’t be fun, but I’ll be alright, it’ll be over soon. In the meantime I’ll just think about nice things like a world sans stairs, and friendly dogs, and so you do, and you are imagining your friendly dog, and he is a sort of Burmese/ retriever cross with a charming little wiggle in his wagging tail, and you think maybe you will name him Gus, and it is good. And then you come to the top of a flight of stairs and it says “Floor 3”, and suddenly Gus morphs into a snarling Rottweiler named Wolf with a scar down his lip. And you want the old Gus back, and maybe you cry a little.

Maybe you are reading this because you are hoping to know what it is like where we are. In that case, we will try to paint you a picture: You are on a boat the size of Dartmouth Hall. You really want to go to sleep, because you have been climbing up some things for 10 or so hours. But first you have to get back to your room from dinner. The boat seems to have been designed by a sadistic man who probably does not even like friendly dogs. You see a sign that says “Rooms 144-180” and an arrow. Your room is 172, so you follow the arrow. Pretty soon you come to a T. One sign says “Rooms 100-122”, with an arrow pointing one way, and another sign says “Rooms 185-200” with an arrow pointing the other way. You stand there for a while. Then you turn around to retrace your steps. The way is blocked by a horde of techno-blaring, tight jeans and shiny gold shoes-wearing, shrieking, smirking, brutish Euro teens who seem to have nothing better to do on a Sunday overnight than roam the halls like cattle, except that cattle are generally kind, placid, good-natured creatures with standards of personal hygiene. Also, you haven’t slept much lately, and you start to feel like you are trapped in a madhouse.

So if this post is a bit disjointed, rambling, and nonsensical, try to imagine that it is very early in the morning, you very much wants to go to bed, and the aforementioned Euro kids have turned the entire ship into a floating disco. And that isn’t so bad, maybe you even like Europop, but in addition to this, there is an intermittent pounding sound, rather like bowling balls are being dropped on top of your cabin from a few hundred feet. Also, the phone in your room keeps ringing, and you expect it will be someone telling you to abandon ship, but it is actually a drunk middle-aged Greek guy for whom prank calls have apparently retained their hilarity past the age of 17.

(In other words, today we woke up at 6AM to begin our circumnavigation of the Ancient city. We started with yes, a hike, up to the Philopappos Monument for a sunrise lecture. Stops at the Pnyx, Hill of the Muses, Kerameikos and the Areopagus were made before our final stop, the Acropolis. A rather unfortunate power outage at the Astor was, well, unfortunate. The end of the day saw a frame pack-packed bus, train and boat ride towards our next stop, Crete! Sleep was hard to come by on the boat. European “fashion” was not.)

Day 8 Photo Gallery:

Taking a photo opp on our sunrise hike.

Taking a photo opp on our sunrise hike.

The Philopappos monument towers over the Athenian plain.

The Philopappos monument towers over the Athenian plain.

Group Leader Jason surveys the somewhat satisfactory scene.

Group Leader Jason surveys the somewhat satisfactory scene.

Getting our bearings in an early morning Acropolis view lecture.

Getting our bearings in an early morning Acropolis view lecture.

A conga line of fuzzy caterpillars: an apparently typical feature of Attic topography.

A conga line of fuzzy caterpillars: an apparently typical feature of Attic topography.

A Greek trash dump...we mean flea market.

A Greek trash dump...we mean flea market.

Jerry, Dallis and our TA Sarah take a break before continuing on the circumnavigation of Ancient Athens.

Jerry, Dallis and our TA Sarah take a break before continuing on the circumnavigation of Ancient Athens.

Alex A samples the traditional 9 am flea market souvlaki.

Alex A samples the traditional 9 am flea market souvlaki.

Professor Christesen describes the construction of the Ancient walls in Kerameikos.

Professor Christesen describes the construction of the Ancient walls in Kerameikos.

Dallis, Katie and Alex M. get in touch with their inner tourist in front of the Parthenon.

Dallis, Katie and Alex M. get in touch with their inner tourist in front of the Parthenon.

Who needs a classroom when you have the sites right in front of you? The FSP takes notes while walking around the outer edges of the Acropolis.

Who needs a classroom when you have the sites right in front of you? The FSP takes notes while walking around the outer edges of the Acropolis.

The beloved image packets get some exercise under the looming South wall of the Acropolis.

The beloved image packets get some exercise under the looming South wall of the Acropolis.

It might have taken a bus ride, a metro ride and a some serious walking to get there, but the FSP makes it to the Piraeus and set sails for Crete.

It might have taken a bus ride, a metro ride and a some serious walking to get there, but the FSP makes it to the Piraeus and set sails for Crete.